Earthwatch Summer Program 2014



Our Programs:

  • Hawk Mountain, July 26-29, 2014 in Kempton, PA.
  • Light and Life in the Bay, August 2-6, 2014 in Barneget Bay, NJ.


Program Overview
Educators will have the opportunity to participate in field-based experiments that support researchers' understandings about the environment. This is an invaluable experience intended to be transferred to the classroom and shared with students year after year.

Teachers will better understand the Science Practices as specified in the Next Generation Science Standards for their application in classroom instruction, curriculum and assessment:  
  • Asking questions
  • Developing and using models
  • Planning and carrying out investigations
  • Analyzing and interpreting data
  • Using mathematics and computational thinking
  • Constructing explanations
  • Engaging in argument from evidence
  • Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information

Teachers may attend one or both weeks.
Registration fee: District pays $500 per week.
Teachers will receive a stipend of $80 per day.


Applications deadline: June 13, 2014. Space is limited.


To apply for this program: Earthwatch Application

 




 Bald EagleAmerican Kestrel
Expedition - Hawk Mountain

The cost and flexibility of food searching flights on avian scavengers

Although Turkey Vultures and Black Vultures rank as the world’s two most common and widely distributed avian scavengers, we remain largely ignorant of the costs and benefits of their food searching flights. This is unfortunate as these two avian scavengers represent species that are doing well at a time when most other vultures are in serious decline. Teachers’ research will inform questions about food searching, and provide clues for determining why many other vulture species are in decline. 

Supported by post-doc Jules Winter of Drexel University with Erin Brown and researchers at the Acopian Center for Conservation Learning.

The research will inform the extent to which food-searching flight behavior differs between turkey and black vultures, as well as the extent to which flight behavior with each species shifts due to environmental factors.  Teachers will engage in field observations of the flight behavior of both species.  In small groups they will design questions, collect, analyze, and present preliminary data that furthers an understanding of predator/prey relationships under varied environmental situations.  

Teacher’s testimonial in response to the question "How could you use what you’ve learned in this program in your teaching?” "Most significantly is the importance of allowing students to develop questions based on observations…. I learned much more about critical thinking and organizing questions... Much better understanding of using Excel as a research tool.”


Program Eligibility

  • Teachers in grades K-12 are eligible to apply for the program.
  • We can accommodate only 6 teachers and cannot guarantee your acceptance. Should registration exceed 6 participants, the Program in Teacher Preparation will contact your district for more information.

Meals and Accommodations


Participants will reside on campus in Kempton, PA at the Acopian Center for Conservation Learning from Sunday to Wednesday, July 26-30, 2014.  The center provides air conditioned double rooms, semi-private bathrooms, a kitchen and laundry facilities.  Breakfast, lunch and dinner will be catered by a local chef and served in the dining room.



Tagging the Terrapin Turtles

QUEST - Terrapins of the Jersey Shore is on Facebook.

Expedition - Light and Life in the Bay

Explore one of the most extensive salt marsh ecosystems on the East Coast and contribute to research about the Terrapin turtle
.

Terrapins prey upon crabs and snail which are most often found underwater; are terrapins able to forage effectively when turbidity caused by boat activity reduces visibility? Teachers will develop their own questions, collect original data and complete their own analyses to help identify conservation concerns. These results will help inform our understanding of human impacts not only on terrapins, but the aquatic community as a whole in Barnegat Bay and beyond. After completion of this course, teachers will be confident in their understanding of the scientific method by experiencing first-hand the thought process that scientists implement every day.

The program will include data collection, data analysis and group discussions, supported by the lead scientist Abby Domini and post-doc Jules Winter of Drexel University. 
 
In this field-based program teachers will capture, tag and measure terrapins, as well as collect prey items to evaluate whether visual cues used by terrapins to find prey are affected by anthropogenic activity in the bay. Most important, you will be mentored in how to observe biological patterns and how to frame research hypothesis/questions and then gather data to address those inquiries. This long-running teacher program in the US has shown that field opportunities refresh and energize teachers, inspiring them to share their first-hand experiences of the natural world with their students. They learn about environmental sustainability and gain hands-on experience in the valuable skills of scientific inquiry and observation – and their field experiences provide real-world context for teaching textbook principles.
 
Teacher testimonial:"After years of teaching the same topics in somewhat the same way, this experience has reminded me of the importance of looking at things from many different perspectives. One thing that I really appreciated about the scientists we worked with was that they presented ideas and gathered facts. They reminded us that we can make decisions that can and will affect our environment. That’s what we want our own students to do: think for themselves and draw their own conclusions.”
 

 
Program Eligibility
  • Teachers in grades K-12 are eligible to apply for the program.
  • We can accommodate only 8 teachers and cannot guarantee your acceptance.  Should registration exceed 8 participants, the Program in Teacher Preparation will contact your district for more information.  
 

Meals and Accommodations


Participants will reside on campus in Waretown, NJ at the Lighthouse Center for Natural Resource Education from Sunday to Tuesday, August 2-5, 2014 and return home on Tuesday afternoon. The final day of the program, Wednesday, August 6 will be held on the Princeton University campus where research findings will be presented.  The center provides double rooms, air conditioning, laundry facilities, a computer lab, lounge, and shared bathrooms with hot showers. Breakfast, lunch and dinner will be catered by a local chef and served in the dining room.
 

Application Process

To apply for this program: Earthwatch Application
 
 
Applications deadline: June 13, 2014.
 
For further information please contact:
Anne Catena, Ed.D., Director, Professional Development Initiatives 
Gina Mastro, Manager, Professional Development Initiatives
Program in Teacher Preparation, Princeton University
41 William Street Princeton, NJ 08540, 609-258-2536



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Program in Teacher Preparation, 41 William Street, Princeton, NJ 08540
Phone: (609) 258-3336 FAX: (609) 258-4527

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